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Welcome to the AntipodeanSF Radio Show, hosted by the editor of AntipodeanSF, Ion Newcombe, aka "Nuke" or "The Jollyfish". Ion selects the best in speculative flash fiction for these shows, with stories often narrated by the authors themselves. 

Listen in weekly to a show devoted to the presentation of flash speculative fiction stories (science fiction, fantasy, and horror).

The AntiSF Radio show also features discussions and panel presentations recorded at various speculative fiction conventions and awards ceremonies.

AntiSF is where speculative flash fiction belongs - downside up!

 

Jun 17, 2017

Greetings fellow travellers in-system, welcome to Abastumani. Take note of that dark reddish cast, and never forget that this was one of the last large-sized bodies discovered in the outer belt way, way back in 1935 by Cyril Jackson in Johannessburg. Days here last about 17 hours, and we’re spa specialists just like...


Jun 10, 2017

Abashiri by name, this main belt body, measuring about 9 kilometres in diameter, has a day that lasts 4 hours and was discovered by Japanese Astronomers. It is named for the city of Abashiri, known for its fishing industry, also in Japan of course. Well, folks, I’m Nuke, your host and editor, not Japanese, although I...


Jun 3, 2017

Greetings, little greels. Breathe and be welcome to the AntipodeanSF Radio Show Abanderada, a main belt object named in honour of Argentine first lady Eva Perón, loosely translated from Spanish as "woman with a banner" - So, greels, abandaradas, take a breath, and consider yourself a crusader for social and...


May 27, 2017

Greetings and salutations speculative fiction feasters. Hi, I am indeed Nuke, and this is the AntiSF radio Show AAVSO, stuck right in the middle of the belt, rocky, and labelled with an acronym that celebrates the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) maintaining the largest database of variable...


May 20, 2017

Welcome to the mother of all AntipodeanSF shows that feature the letter A. Designated Aavasaksa, you’ll see that it’s about 8 kilometres in diameter, and it was discovered at Turko Observatory in Southwest Finland in 1938. No doubt on a cold night. Hope you’re not having one of those. Better to be warm. And...